Tarot, Enneagram and MBTI Correlations

A Complementary Application of Models for Introspective Study

1 May 2005; 22 November 2010; 22 July 2012. Modified: 24 January 2013.
First published at Intraspec.ca; moved here 14 June 2013.
Last Modified: 19 February 2015.

This page deals with the complementary application of three models used for introspective work.

We begin with an examination of Mary Katherine Greer's Tarot constellations and her method for calculating an individual's Soul, Personality and Hidden Factor Cards, followed by an essay in which we correlate Greer's constellations (1-9) with ennea-types (1-9) in the Enneagram, a typology of personality.

We present a tabular review adapted from Fudjack/Dinkelaker (1996-7) showing various authors' correlations of Myers-Briggs (MBTI) types and the ennea-types, a summary of findings, and a color illustration of Greer's constellations and the ennea-types.

For detailed information about the Enneagram, see The Enneagram: A Typology of Personality.
Additional material by Fudjack/Dinkelaker is also presented on that page.

Tarot Constellations

Tarot Constellations

Greer's Tarot "constellations" are nine numerologic groupings of the tarot deck, each group identified by one of the first nine cards in the major arcana. For example, the first constellation, Magician (1), includes Wheel of Fortune (10, 1+0=1) and Sun (19, 1+9=10=1+0=1). The minor arcana follow the major arcana on the basis of number; thus, all fives (Wands, Cups, Swords, Pentacles) are part of the Hierophant (fifth) constellation. One's birth date is used to calculate which group identifies one's life purpose in terms of Personality and Soul Cards, and sometimes also in terms of a Hidden Factor or Teacher Card. Greer provides lengthy descriptions for each of these cards in her book, which is now out of print. I'm not sure of the copyright status, but a PDF of the text is available online.

Source: Tarot Constellations: Patterns of personal destiny
Mary K. Greer
North Hollywood, CA: Newcastle (1988:24-26)
Out of print.

In any tarot reading, I always first determine a querent's PERSONALITY CARD and SOUL CARD, based on their birth date. With just this information, we are able to see what a person most needs to learn in their life, and what lessons will bring them to an understanding of this urge.

Using your birthdate, let's numerologically calculate your Personality, Soul and Hidden Factor Cards.

First, to find your Personality-Soul combination (destiny pattern), add together your month, day, and year of birth like this:

For example:Margaret Mead :: December 16, 1901 =12
16
1901
1929

Then, add each digit in the resulting number: 1 + 9 + 2 + 9 = 21. Keep any number from 1 to 22. The resulting number is your Personality Number, which in this case is 21 and corresponds to the twenty-first major arcana card, The World (21). Your Personality Card indicates personality characteristics that you develop easily and lessons that you learn early in your life as they seem to resonate with your essential nature.

You then add together 2 + 1 =3 to find your Soul Number. Anthropologist Margaret Mead's Soul Number (3) corresponds to the third major arcana card, The Empress (3). Your Soul Card shows your soul purpose: those qualities in yourself that you must express and use in order to feel fulfilled in whatever you do.

In some cases, the number will add up to more than 22. Since there are only 22 major arcana cards, reduce the number to 22 or less.

For example:Mick Jagger :: July 26, 1943 =7
26
1943
1976

1 + 9 + 7 + 6 = 23
2 + 3 =   5

In the case of rock singer Mick Jagger, the fifth card, The Hierophant (5), is both his Personality and Soul Card. Anyone with the same number for both cards is ... more focused and directed.

There is one case in which more than two cards can appear. If your first number is 19, you will have three cards.

Martin Luther King, Jr. :: January 15, 1929 =1
15
1929
1945

[1945] = 19
1 + 9 = 10
1 + 0 =   1

It is only when your birthdate totals 19, like that of Martin Luther King, Jr., that you will have such a triple sequence... [In this example] consider the Sun (19) as your Personality Card, the Magician (1) as your Soul Card, and The Wheel of Fortune (10) as your Teacher Card...


Personality-Soul
(Destiny) Patterns
Hidden Factor
(Shadow/Teacher) Cards
1-110 & 19
10-119
19-10-110 (Teacher Card Only)
2-211 & 20
11-220
20-211
3-312 & 21
12-321
21-312
4-413 & 22
13-422
22-413
5-514
14-5*
6-615
15-6*
7-716
16-7*
8-817
17-8*
9-918
18-9*
*Personality Cards 14 through 18, as "nighttime cards", include the hidden factor concept within themselves and therefore have no separate Hidden Factor Card.

The Hidden Factor

There is also a "Hidden Factor Card" - somewhat more complicated to explain. Not all constellations have a Hidden Factor Card, some have only one, and some have two. The Hidden Factor "challenges you to go beyond your usual experiences".

Greer writes that the Hidden Factor Card "[o]ften ... becomes your goal; it represents what you strive to understand and develop in yourself and in the world around you" (p.31).

Tarot Constellations, Ennea-type and MBTI Correlations

Notes on the complementary application of models...

I find it useful to compare results from different personality typologies and systems. Although such comparisons may involve fundamentally different frameworks, variables and descriptors, their complementary predicates often make it possible to derive useful insights for introspective work. In this essay, I will posit a correlation between the nine Tarot constellations and the "ennea-types" identified in a personality typology called the Enneagram. Correlations between the ennea-types and Myers-Briggs (MBTI) types will then be explored in an effort to achieve synthesis.

Many people new to the Enneagram have a difficult time identifying their Chief Factor, usually described by one of the nine ennea-types and sometimes by a combination of two (a sub-type). This difficulty may be resolved by exploring other models in which one can "find" oneself more readily, as, for example, Tarot constellations or the MBTI, then comparing that result with ennea-type and sub-type descriptors.

As we've seen previously, Greer's model identifies specific Tarot cards - the Soul, Personality, and Hidden Factors or Teacher - on the basis of a numerologic calculation using the date of birth. In the table and illustration below, the major arcana have been grouped by numerologic value, each group represented by its lowest reduced number (for simplicity, I'll call this the Soul Card). Thus, for example, Tower (16, 1+6=7) is part of the Chariot (7) constellation, while Temperance (14, 1+4=5) is part of the Hierophant (5) constellation.

Let us posit a one-to-one correlation between the Soul Cards (1-9) with the ennea-types (1-9), such that constellation One, identified by the Magician (1), correlates with ennea-type One; constellation Two, identified by the High Priestess (2), correlates with ennea-type Two; etc. This means that, if you calculate your Soul Card using Greer's model, the result will correlate with your ennea-type, thus indicating your Chief Feature. We have no statistical evidence that this is actually the case. It is certainly possible that the correlation will not work at all, though anecdotal reports suggest that, in many cases, it does.

Let us also posit that, once we've identified our Soul Card, we've identified a dominant archetypal pattern in personality. Our Chief Feature may be described by that pattern, or subsequent analysis of the pattern may lead to introspective insight which helps pinpoint the Chief Feature.

In my case, the Soul Card is Hermit (9). That leads me to consider ennea-type Nine as my Chief Feature. But studies of the Enneagram and my experience with the model persuade me that a sub-type, Five/Four, is the Chief Feature, not Nine. On the face of it, the one-to-one correspondence doesn't seem to work. But we're engaged in an introspective process, here; let's see what we can make of this.

We might think of the major arcana as representative of archetypal patterns which sometimes present in personality, reflected in our thoughts, feelings and expression. They are "real", in that sense, even if we define or personify them only in creative imagination.

If we think of the major arcana as archetypal patterns, we might identify a dominant archetype that is closely bound with the "I", through which meaning is apprehended and actions are justified. In Greer's model, that dominant archetype would be represented by the Soul Card, reinforced by the other major arcana in the same constellation. Hermit/Moon resonates for me in that respect, but does not appear to correlate with my Five/Four ennea-type. Or does it?

When I work with the Enneagram, or any other model of personality, including the MBTI, I internalize it, presuming that all of the types exist as principals within me. In this instance, though I resonate with Five/Four, I can engage each of the ennea-types in dialogue. While Five/Four is my Chief Feature, I can also dialogue with Five and Four, even with both at once. Whether such dialogues involve the use of creative imagination or represent a different mechanism that is not self-intimating, my experience of such communications is quite real.

Now, the fact that I can communicate with all nine ennea-types in this context is consistent with the descriptors for ennea-type Nine, which tends to identify with all of the other types. Nine experiences accidia (self-forgetting) and has difficulty with personal boundaries; avoiding conflict, Nine sees merit in every position. In its highest expression, however, ennea-type Nine is characterized by the desire to recognize personal boundaries and transcend them, rising above the limitations of personal perspective in the quest for universal truth.

That certainly describes my objective, but it doesn't reveal the mechanics by which I achieve it. Where ennea-type Nine represents an appreciation of all "players" as equal partners in a spiritual gestalt and is gripped by the need to transcend the limitations of personal perspectives, ennea-type Five/Four is a detached observer with a tendency to withdraw in melancholic rumination, searching for fundamental truth regarding the nature of self and other. That strikes home. The defensive mechanisms, ruminative (melancholic) and analytic assessments engaged by my Chief Feature lead me, through rather tortuous (often schizoid) introspective territory, to eventual understanding and the achievement of an ennea-type Nine transcendence. This is very similar to the quest of the Hermit, who seeks truth through introspective work and solitude, often struggling with a need for personal acceptance. As each new existential problem is resolved, through empathy and analysis, knowledge is gained that can prove helpful to others.

The Hermit (9) "fits" me, but again, shouldn't ennea-type Five/Four more properly indicate Hierophant (5) and the Emperor (4)? Other major arcana in the these two constellations hold significance for me - Temperance (14), the Fool (22) and, in particular, Death (13). Perhaps these themes have been and remain fixations for me. Perhaps I have focused on those themes in result of childhood traumata in response to which I dissociated from my true nature and perpetuate that split by focusing on familiar themes. My Chief Feature, in that sense, may indeed be the self-forgetting Nine. And if I don't remember, how do I know that I've forgotten?

If we explore the myth(s) associated with our dominant archetype, we tend to experience a resonance - as if reading our own personal "story". The Hephaestus myth holds meaning for me, but it is the myth of Amun that truly resonates. Amun had no story of his own, so he borrowed the stories of all the other gods. That's certainly consistent with ennea-type Nine, and it may be at the bottom of the Hermit's quest. It is said that when the Chief Feature is revealed, one experiences an AHA! realization that is at once deeply humiliating and a great relief. I have experienced both in my work with Five/Four, and acutely so. On the other hand, if I am Nine, perhaps the best way to recover my sense of self is via Four and Five, where I can grapple with the problem more productively, using well-honed tools.

In terms of the MBTI, my type is INFJ/INTJ. Introvert is obvious (I), as is Intuitive (N). Tests show F (Feeling) dominance, and close friends tend to see me as an NF, but NT (Intuitive Thinking) is usually my salvation in crisis. I admire Ps (Perceivers), but J (Judging) is home turf. Does that help in the current assessment of types?

There is a useful online test that codes equivalences among the functions as "X". The Thomson-Maidenbaum Personality Inventory was created by Lenore Thompson, author of Personality Type: An Owner's Manual(1998; see pp.13-20), in collaboration with Jungian analyst Aryeh Maidenbaum, PhD. Using this instument, my result is XNXJ.

Fudjack and Dinkelaker (1996-7) compare the work of several writers who have presented correlations between MBTI and Enneagram types. Adapted from their work, the following table summarizes those efforts.
Note the placements for INFJ (eight instances) and INTJ (seven instances).

AUTHORS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Associated MBTI Types according to Flautt based on his analysis of the EM survey ENFJ
ISTJ
ESFJ
ENFJ
ESFJ
ENTP
INFJ
INFP
INTP
INTJ
ISFJ
ESFJ
ESFP
ENFP
ESTJ
ENTJ
INFP
Richards/Flautt/ Baron (1997) ISTJ
ISFJ
ESTJ
ENTJ
INFJ
ESFJ
ENFJ
ESFP
ENFP
ISFP
ESTP
ENTP
ENTJ
ESTJ
INFP
INFJ
INTP
ISTP
INTJ
ISTJ
ISFJ
ESFJ
ESTP
ESFP
ENTP
ENFP
ENTJ
ESTJ
ENTP
ISFP
INFP
Associated MBTI Types according to Riso's theory ESTJ
ENTJ
ESFJ
ENFJ
none INFJ
INTJ
ISTP
INTP
ISFP
INFP
ESTP
ESFP
ENFP
ENTP
ISTJ
ISFJ
MBTI Prototypes identified by Fudjack/ Dinkelaker (1996) J prefs ESFJ
ENFJ
ESTP
ESFP
INFJ
INTJ
INTP
ISTP
ISTJ
ISFJ
ENTP
ENFP
ESTJ
ENTJ
INFP
ISFP
Fudjack/ Dinkelaker 'hybrid' assignments (1997) All Js EXFJ =
ESFJ
ENFJ
EXTP =
ESTP
ENTP
INXJ =
INFJ
INTJ
IXTP =
INTP
ISTP
ISXJ =
ISFJ
ISTJ
EXFP =
ESFP
ENFP
EXTJ =
ENTJ
ESTJ
IXFP =
ISFP
INFP
Associated MBTI Types according to Geldart ESTJ
ENTJ
ESFJ
ENFJ
none ENTP
ENFP
ISTP
INTP
ISFP
INFP
ESTP
ESFP
ISTJ
ISFJ
INTJ
INFJ
Gabbard's 'representative' types ESTJ
ENTJ
ENTJ
ENFJ
ESFJ
ISFJ
INFJ
INTJ
INFP
INTP
ESFP
ISFP
ESTP
ENTP
ENFP
ENTP
ESFP
ESFJ
Source:
The Enneagram and the MBTI®
   • Adapted from: Charts (1996-7)
   • Adapted from: The Impact of 'S-N Blindness' on the Distribution of MBTI Types Across the Enneazones
   • A Brief Review and Update

The preponderance of INFJ/INTJ placements appears to indicate ennea-types Four and Five. Note also that these two MBTI types are usually paired, suggesting that most of these authors do not treat the F/T variables as sufficiently different to justify correlation with a separate ennea-type.

In summary, within the limited parameters of this exploration, our correlation of Greer's Tarot constellation with the ennea-types does not appear inconsistent with either model, but we cannot conclude that identification of the Soul Card clearly identifies one's Chief Feature among the nine ennea-types. We posited the existence of a dominant archetypal pattern, represented by the Soul Card, which might indicate the Chief Feature or help us identify it through subsequent analysis. We discussed the Hermit (9) Soul Card in my case, identified ennea-type Five/Four as dominant, but showed that Five/Four best describes defensive and analytic mechanisms which lead to insight and understanding consistent with the Hermit theme and ennea-type Nine. Finally, we looked at correlations between MBTI and Enneagram types, noted that INFJ/INTJ represent my MBTI type, and that most authors correlate these with ennea-types Four and Five.

These correlations have enabled me to review my understanding of all three models and explore insights of introspective value.

# Constellation Major Arcana Minor Arcana
One Magician 1, 10, 19 10s, Aces
Two High Priestess 2, 11, 20 2s
Three Empress 3, 12, 21 3s
Four Emperor 4, 13, 22(0) 4s
Five Hierophant 5, 14 5s
Six Lovers 6, 15 6s
Seven Chariot 7, 16 7s
Eight Strength 8, 17 8s
Nine Hermit 9, 18 9s

In the layout below, using the Rider Tarot Deck:

  • Strength is 8 and Justice is 11.
    In some decks, on the contrary, Justice is 8 and Strength is 11; see e.g.: Barbara Walker Tarot, Tarot of the Ages, Dali Universal Tarot, Millennium Tarot, Tarot of Marseilles, Crowley's Thoth Tarot, etc.
  • Fool (0) is treated as number 22.
  • Numbered buttons designate the constellations and the ennea-types.Enneagram
    That is, Tarot constellation One, Magician (1), correlates with ennea-type One; constellation Two, High Priestess (2), correlates with ennea-type Two; etc.
Tarot and Ennea-type correspondences. Numbered buttons designate the constellations and the ennea-types.


For a Crowley Thoth On-line Tarot Reading,
click here


Lotus Tarot